Have you ever met Mr. Mark Biggerman? Well, if you have met him, you can get to know him a little bit better, and if you haven’t I can guarantee you he has some pretty great advice for attorneys.

Mr. Biggerman has represented both individuals and business clients in all courts, even the United States Supreme Court!  That is a rare honor.

 

What has been your most interesting case/matter so far?

I was fortunate enough to be one of the rare attorneys that get to argue a case before the U.S. Supreme Court.  It was an age discrimination case: General Dynamics Land Systems, Inc. v. Cline, 540 U.S. 581, 124 S.Ct. 1236, 157 L.Ed.2d 1094 (2004).

 

What steps do you take to prepare for a difficult case?

Preparation, preparation, and more preparation.  I review all of the evidence until I have it committed to memory and prepare my witnesses until I am convinced they are ready to testify.  No cutting corners.  I also spend a lot of time getting as organized as I can.  In my opinion, most cases are won by the attorney who is the most prepared and organized.

 

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?

I get the most satisfaction from being able to successfully solve a client’s problem.  When you come right down to it, the reason people hire an attorney is because they have a problem.  Being able to resolve it for them (whether that involves simply discussion, negotiations, settlement, or trial) is the most rewarding aspect of my job.

 

If you could give advice to new attorneys, what would it be?

I would encourage them to develop relationships with as many experienced attorneys as they can.  In the first few years, young lawyers face many situations in which law school did not prepare them for.  In those cases, having experienced attorneys that they can reach out to for advice is invaluable.

 

What is your least favorite part of your job?

Administrative work.  Since I am a solo practitioner, I have to do most of it myself.  Not only can it be tedious but it takes a lot more time than most people think.  As a result, it takes away from the time I can spend practicing law.