Back to Class: Grammar 101 – are you affected or effected?

Back to Class: Grammar 101 – are you affected or effected?

No matter what school we attended, or how long we attended it, there are some things that we just don’t get right.  Fortunately, these posts will not be examples of mistakes made in physics…   http://cadyreporting.com/cady/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Fast-Furious.mp4 Bad grammar might not have consequences as physically serious as bad physics but nevertheless, it can make you seem like you don’t know which way the apple falls. Are you effected? No. Do you have an affect? No.  These are 2 words that are continually baffling to most people.  Here is the clearest way I have found to remember them: Effect=Noun (Her testimony had an emotional effect on me.) Affect=Verb (Her testimony affected me emotionally.) As a court reporter, how can you remember that for your transcript?  At Quick and Dirty tips a pneumonic device is recommended: RAVEN – R Affect=Verb Effect=Noun If you are an attorney or paralegal, your briefs, letters, and notes need to be accurate to reflect your level of professionalism.  if you are a court reporter, you need to know which word to put into the record to make an accurate and quality transcript for attorneys and clients.  If you don’t use these terms correctly, the effect of the testimony could be lost.  Obviously, a bad record would be unacceptable from a court reporting firm.  Everyone involved in a case needs a grammatically correct transcript of the proceedings. Don’t let a bad court reporter affect your case – click here to schedule with Cady Reporting...
Guest Authors

Guest Authors

Guest authors bring a unique perspective to our blog. They are an invaluable part of the legal community here in Cleveland, Ohio and around the country. The guests who we have chosen know how “do the lawyering” much better than I do, and we sincerely appreciate them lending their expertise to share with all of our dear readers and enhancing the legal profession. Would you like to be featured on the blog? Sent me a message via the live chat function on our website. We would love to hear from you!   Here are some of our previous guest authors. Click to access their articles. Adrian Thompson of Taft Stettinius Richik Sarkar of McGlinchy Stafford Judge James L. Kimbler...
Cady Legal Dictionary

Cady Legal Dictionary

Dear Reader, Have you ever been reading a legal document, transcript, exhibit, or other law-related material and you come across a word that you don’t quite remember what it means? Maybe in one of our guest blog posts, you see a word and would like to see it in layman’s terms to be able to explain it to your client. If you are from a court reporting firm or an individual court reporter, we will be adding the steno briefs to help you when you are on the job. Chuck Cady, owner of Cady Reporting has been the 3-time winner and retiree of the Ohio Speed Cup Contest. He also teaches the seminar, “Train Your Brain to Brief on the Fly”. It shows reporters how to take better, faster steno notes while on the job. If there is a word that you would like to have added to the dictionary, feel free to contact me through our online chat function and I will be happy to do so! Thank you for taking the time to check out our blog! Sincerely, Michelle Cady-Cook   Click here for our Blog Article Index where you can access the full list of...
Back to Class: Grammar Rules 101 – There, Their, They’re

Back to Class: Grammar Rules 101 – There, Their, They’re

No matter what school we attended or how long we had attended it, there are some things that we just don’t get right every time. Fortunately, these posts will not be examples of mistakes made in physics… http://cadyreporting.com/cady/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Speed_Bus_Jump.mp4   Bad grammar might not have consequences as physically serious as bad physics, but nevertheless, it can make you seem like you don’t know which way the apple falls. Hey, are you still their? No, I’m over they’re. Do those sentences grind your nerves a little? They should. There, their and they’re are not interchangeable. The information below will clarify the uses of each of these so that your writing is professional and pristine. There – place Their – possession They’re – posse (a group of words that hangs out together and makes a cool contraction) Examples: There: “No, the doctor was not there when the baby was born.” Their: “It was their car that caused the accident.” They’re: “They’re not going to settle, so please prepare for trial.” It is absolutely necessary for court reporters to use the correct grammar. If they did not, a transcript would basically be unusable. What if a court reporter’s transcript read something like this: “Their going to file a medical malpractice lawsuit. They’re are many exhibits to copy and there not going to happy about it.” Obviously, that kind of product from a court reporter is unacceptable. You want a transcript that is grammatically correct each time.  The very testimony of a transcript can be changed by using bad grammar. To ensure that your court reporter knows which way the grammatical apple falls, click...